Transfer of improved movement technique after receiving verbal external focus and video instruction

Anne Benjaminse, Wouter Welling, Bert Otten, Alli Gokeler

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Abstract

It is unknown how movement patterns that are learned carry over to the field. The objective was to deter- mine whether training during a jump-landing task would transfer to lower extremity kinematics and kinetics during sidestep cutting.Methods Forty healthy athletes were assigned to the ver- bal internal focus (IF, n = 10), verbal external focus (EF, n = 10), video (VI, n = 10) or control (CTRL, n = 10) group. A jump-landing task was performed as baseline followed by training blocks (TR1 and TR2) and a post-test. Group-spe- cific instructions were given in TR1 and TR2. In addition, participants in the IF, EF and VI groups were free to ask for feedback after every jump during TR1 and TR2. Retention was tested after 1 week. Transfer of learned skill was deter- mined by having participants perform a 45° unanticipated sidestep cutting task. 3D hip, knee and ankle kinematics and kinetics were the main outcome measures.Results During sidestep cutting, the VI group showed greater hip flexion ROM compared to the EF and IF groups (p < 0.001). The EF (p < 0.036) and VI (p < 0.004) groups had greater knee flexion ROM compared to the IF group. Conclusions Improved jump-landing technique car- ried over to sidestep cutting when stimulating an external attentional focus combined with self-controlled feedback. Transfer to more sport-specific skills may demonstrate potential to reduce injuries on the field. Clinicians and practitioners are encouraged to apply instructions that stimulate an external focus of attention, of which visual instructions seem to be very powerful.

Keywords

  • motor learning
  • injury prevention
  • sport

Cite this

@article{941a56a632254904948823171e1b728c,
title = "Transfer of improved movement technique after receiving verbal external focus and video instruction",
abstract = "It is unknown how movement patterns that are learned carry over to the field. The objective was to deter- mine whether training during a jump-landing task would transfer to lower extremity kinematics and kinetics during sidestep cutting.Methods Forty healthy athletes were assigned to the ver- bal internal focus (IF, n = 10), verbal external focus (EF, n = 10), video (VI, n = 10) or control (CTRL, n = 10) group. A jump-landing task was performed as baseline followed by training blocks (TR1 and TR2) and a post-test. Group-spe- cific instructions were given in TR1 and TR2. In addition, participants in the IF, EF and VI groups were free to ask for feedback after every jump during TR1 and TR2. Retention was tested after 1 week. Transfer of learned skill was deter- mined by having participants perform a 45° unanticipated sidestep cutting task. 3D hip, knee and ankle kinematics and kinetics were the main outcome measures.Results During sidestep cutting, the VI group showed greater hip flexion ROM compared to the EF and IF groups (p < 0.001). The EF (p < 0.036) and VI (p < 0.004) groups had greater knee flexion ROM compared to the IF group. Conclusions Improved jump-landing technique car- ried over to sidestep cutting when stimulating an external attentional focus combined with self-controlled feedback. Transfer to more sport-specific skills may demonstrate potential to reduce injuries on the field. Clinicians and practitioners are encouraged to apply instructions that stimulate an external focus of attention, of which visual instructions seem to be very powerful.",
keywords = "motor learning, injury prevention, sport, sport, motoriek, blessures, preventie",
author = "Anne Benjaminse and Wouter Welling and Bert Otten and Alli Gokeler",
year = "2017",
language = "English",
journal = "Knee surgery, sports traumatology, arthroscopy : official journal of the European Society of Sports Traumatology, Knee Surgery and Arthroscopy",
issn = "1433-7347",
publisher = "Springer",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Transfer of improved movement technique after receiving verbal external focus and video instruction

AU - Benjaminse, Anne

AU - Welling, Wouter

AU - Otten, Bert

AU - Gokeler, Alli

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - It is unknown how movement patterns that are learned carry over to the field. The objective was to deter- mine whether training during a jump-landing task would transfer to lower extremity kinematics and kinetics during sidestep cutting.Methods Forty healthy athletes were assigned to the ver- bal internal focus (IF, n = 10), verbal external focus (EF, n = 10), video (VI, n = 10) or control (CTRL, n = 10) group. A jump-landing task was performed as baseline followed by training blocks (TR1 and TR2) and a post-test. Group-spe- cific instructions were given in TR1 and TR2. In addition, participants in the IF, EF and VI groups were free to ask for feedback after every jump during TR1 and TR2. Retention was tested after 1 week. Transfer of learned skill was deter- mined by having participants perform a 45° unanticipated sidestep cutting task. 3D hip, knee and ankle kinematics and kinetics were the main outcome measures.Results During sidestep cutting, the VI group showed greater hip flexion ROM compared to the EF and IF groups (p < 0.001). The EF (p < 0.036) and VI (p < 0.004) groups had greater knee flexion ROM compared to the IF group. Conclusions Improved jump-landing technique car- ried over to sidestep cutting when stimulating an external attentional focus combined with self-controlled feedback. Transfer to more sport-specific skills may demonstrate potential to reduce injuries on the field. Clinicians and practitioners are encouraged to apply instructions that stimulate an external focus of attention, of which visual instructions seem to be very powerful.

AB - It is unknown how movement patterns that are learned carry over to the field. The objective was to deter- mine whether training during a jump-landing task would transfer to lower extremity kinematics and kinetics during sidestep cutting.Methods Forty healthy athletes were assigned to the ver- bal internal focus (IF, n = 10), verbal external focus (EF, n = 10), video (VI, n = 10) or control (CTRL, n = 10) group. A jump-landing task was performed as baseline followed by training blocks (TR1 and TR2) and a post-test. Group-spe- cific instructions were given in TR1 and TR2. In addition, participants in the IF, EF and VI groups were free to ask for feedback after every jump during TR1 and TR2. Retention was tested after 1 week. Transfer of learned skill was deter- mined by having participants perform a 45° unanticipated sidestep cutting task. 3D hip, knee and ankle kinematics and kinetics were the main outcome measures.Results During sidestep cutting, the VI group showed greater hip flexion ROM compared to the EF and IF groups (p < 0.001). The EF (p < 0.036) and VI (p < 0.004) groups had greater knee flexion ROM compared to the IF group. Conclusions Improved jump-landing technique car- ried over to sidestep cutting when stimulating an external attentional focus combined with self-controlled feedback. Transfer to more sport-specific skills may demonstrate potential to reduce injuries on the field. Clinicians and practitioners are encouraged to apply instructions that stimulate an external focus of attention, of which visual instructions seem to be very powerful.

KW - motor learning

KW - injury prevention

KW - sport

KW - sport

KW - motoriek

KW - blessures

KW - preventie

UR - https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28799030

M3 - Article

JO - Knee surgery, sports traumatology, arthroscopy : official journal of the European Society of Sports Traumatology, Knee Surgery and Arthroscopy

JF - Knee surgery, sports traumatology, arthroscopy : official journal of the European Society of Sports Traumatology, Knee Surgery and Arthroscopy

SN - 1433-7347

ER -