The impact of visual impairment on the ability to perform activities of daily living for persons with severe/profound intellectual disability

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Abstract

Background The ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL) as a component of participation is one of the factors that contribute to the quality of life. The ability to perform ADL for persons experiencing severe/profound intellectual disability (ID) may be reduced due to their cognitive and physical capacities. However, until recently, the impact of the significantly prevalent visual impairments on the performance of activities of daily living has not yet been revealed within this group. Aim The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of visual impairment on the performance of Activities of Daily Living for persons with a severe/profound intellectual disability. Method The Barthel Index (BI) and Comfortable Walking Speed (CWS) were employed in order to measure in 240 persons with severe/profound ID and having Gross Motor Functioning Classification System (GMFCS) levels I, II or III the ability of performing activities of daily living (ADL); this included 120 persons with visual impairment. Effects were analysed with linear regression analyses. Results The results of the study demonstrated that visual impairment has a minimal, but significant, effect on the ability of performing Activities of Daily Living (BI) for persons with a severe/profound intellectual disability. Forty four percent of the total BI score can be predicted by the GMFCS level and the level of ID; 45% with the additional presence of visual impairment. GMFCS levels II or III, a profound ID level, and visual impairment yielded lower BI scores compared to GMFCS Level I, severe ID, and no visual impairment. CWS scores did not significantly vary if visual impairment was present. Conclusions Visual impairment does slightly affect the ability to perform ADL in persons experiencing severe/profound ID.
Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)35 - 42
JournalResearch in developmental disabilities
Volume47
Publication statusPublished - 2015

Keywords

  • intellectual disabilities
  • visual impairment
  • daily life

Cite this

@article{d455ac1a2433475d916497db595056cc,
title = "The impact of visual impairment on the ability to perform activities of daily living for persons with severe/profound intellectual disability",
abstract = "Background The ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL) as a component of participation is one of the factors that contribute to the quality of life. The ability to perform ADL for persons experiencing severe/profound intellectual disability (ID) may be reduced due to their cognitive and physical capacities. However, until recently, the impact of the significantly prevalent visual impairments on the performance of activities of daily living has not yet been revealed within this group. Aim The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of visual impairment on the performance of Activities of Daily Living for persons with a severe/profound intellectual disability. Method The Barthel Index (BI) and Comfortable Walking Speed (CWS) were employed in order to measure in 240 persons with severe/profound ID and having Gross Motor Functioning Classification System (GMFCS) levels I, II or III the ability of performing activities of daily living (ADL); this included 120 persons with visual impairment. Effects were analysed with linear regression analyses. Results The results of the study demonstrated that visual impairment has a minimal, but significant, effect on the ability of performing Activities of Daily Living (BI) for persons with a severe/profound intellectual disability. Forty four percent of the total BI score can be predicted by the GMFCS level and the level of ID; 45{\%} with the additional presence of visual impairment. GMFCS levels II or III, a profound ID level, and visual impairment yielded lower BI scores compared to GMFCS Level I, severe ID, and no visual impairment. CWS scores did not significantly vary if visual impairment was present. Conclusions Visual impairment does slightly affect the ability to perform ADL in persons experiencing severe/profound ID.",
keywords = "intellectual disabilities, visual impairment, daily life",
author = "Annemarie Dijkhuizen and Hilgenkamp, {Thessa I.M.} and Wim Krijnen and {van der Schans}, Cees and Aly Waninge",
year = "2015",
language = "English",
volume = "47",
pages = "35 -- 42",
journal = "Research in developmental disabilities",
issn = "0891-4222",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The impact of visual impairment on the ability to perform activities of daily living for persons with severe/profound intellectual disability

AU - Dijkhuizen, Annemarie

AU - Hilgenkamp, Thessa I.M.

AU - Krijnen, Wim

AU - van der Schans, Cees

AU - Waninge, Aly

PY - 2015

Y1 - 2015

N2 - Background The ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL) as a component of participation is one of the factors that contribute to the quality of life. The ability to perform ADL for persons experiencing severe/profound intellectual disability (ID) may be reduced due to their cognitive and physical capacities. However, until recently, the impact of the significantly prevalent visual impairments on the performance of activities of daily living has not yet been revealed within this group. Aim The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of visual impairment on the performance of Activities of Daily Living for persons with a severe/profound intellectual disability. Method The Barthel Index (BI) and Comfortable Walking Speed (CWS) were employed in order to measure in 240 persons with severe/profound ID and having Gross Motor Functioning Classification System (GMFCS) levels I, II or III the ability of performing activities of daily living (ADL); this included 120 persons with visual impairment. Effects were analysed with linear regression analyses. Results The results of the study demonstrated that visual impairment has a minimal, but significant, effect on the ability of performing Activities of Daily Living (BI) for persons with a severe/profound intellectual disability. Forty four percent of the total BI score can be predicted by the GMFCS level and the level of ID; 45% with the additional presence of visual impairment. GMFCS levels II or III, a profound ID level, and visual impairment yielded lower BI scores compared to GMFCS Level I, severe ID, and no visual impairment. CWS scores did not significantly vary if visual impairment was present. Conclusions Visual impairment does slightly affect the ability to perform ADL in persons experiencing severe/profound ID.

AB - Background The ability to perform activities of daily living (ADL) as a component of participation is one of the factors that contribute to the quality of life. The ability to perform ADL for persons experiencing severe/profound intellectual disability (ID) may be reduced due to their cognitive and physical capacities. However, until recently, the impact of the significantly prevalent visual impairments on the performance of activities of daily living has not yet been revealed within this group. Aim The purpose of this study was to investigate the impact of visual impairment on the performance of Activities of Daily Living for persons with a severe/profound intellectual disability. Method The Barthel Index (BI) and Comfortable Walking Speed (CWS) were employed in order to measure in 240 persons with severe/profound ID and having Gross Motor Functioning Classification System (GMFCS) levels I, II or III the ability of performing activities of daily living (ADL); this included 120 persons with visual impairment. Effects were analysed with linear regression analyses. Results The results of the study demonstrated that visual impairment has a minimal, but significant, effect on the ability of performing Activities of Daily Living (BI) for persons with a severe/profound intellectual disability. Forty four percent of the total BI score can be predicted by the GMFCS level and the level of ID; 45% with the additional presence of visual impairment. GMFCS levels II or III, a profound ID level, and visual impairment yielded lower BI scores compared to GMFCS Level I, severe ID, and no visual impairment. CWS scores did not significantly vary if visual impairment was present. Conclusions Visual impairment does slightly affect the ability to perform ADL in persons experiencing severe/profound ID.

KW - intellectual disabilities

KW - visual impairment

KW - daily life

M3 - Article

VL - 47

SP - 35

EP - 42

JO - Research in developmental disabilities

JF - Research in developmental disabilities

SN - 0891-4222

ER -