The convenient city: smart urbanism for a resilient city

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterProfessional

Abstract

The surge of smart city technology, thinking, publications and consultancy offerings is significant. This implies there is something seriously developing. But to what extent is this a new development? In this paper the case will be made that urban design has always had to include new technologies and the smart city movement is just another wave of technology that demands inclusion in urban design practice. Nevertheless, city designers and policy makers should make use of the new possibilities on offering. Interactive urban environments could support healthy living, while smart and responsive regulators could minimize our energy use, and anticipative traffic management could help minimising congestion. Further to this, crowd-sensing could smoothen urban mobility and new forms of 3d-printing may re-use and reduce waste. The core of all new technological potential however is still to service people and to make life for urban citizens better. How could people in search for a convenient life be better serviced? Many of them want to have a nice house, a clean, safe and healthy environment, access to resources such as clean water, renewable energy and healthy food, a resilient place that is not vulnerable for all kinds of climate impacts and possibly some room for contemplation. With Maslow’s ladder in mind, achieving this not only depends on the availability and use of technology, rather a well-designed and integrated urban plan is asked for. Meeting the needs of contemporary urban citizens must be served by what urban design is supposed to deliver, only now with current available technologies in the back pocket. The paper emphasises how to design the convenient city by making use of the available technology, but it also takes a stand on the relativity of the current hype of smart cities.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationData-driven multivalence in the built environment
EditorsNimish Biloria
Place of PublicationCham
PublisherSpringer
Pages37-55
ISBN (Electronic)978-3-030-12180-8
ISBN (Print)978-3-030-12179-2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2020

Fingerprint

urban design
citizen
traffic management
climate effect
congestion
renewable energy
energy use
new technology
inclusion
smart city
city
climate
traffic
food
energy
water
resource
management
resources

Keywords

  • urbanism
  • convenience
  • resilience
  • smart city

Cite this

Roggema, R. (2020). The convenient city: smart urbanism for a resilient city. In N. Biloria (Ed.), Data-driven multivalence in the built environment (pp. 37-55). Cham: Springer. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-12180-8_2
Roggema, Rob. / The convenient city: smart urbanism for a resilient city. Data-driven multivalence in the built environment. editor / Nimish Biloria. Cham : Springer, 2020. pp. 37-55
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Roggema, R 2020, The convenient city: smart urbanism for a resilient city. in N Biloria (ed.), Data-driven multivalence in the built environment. Springer, Cham, pp. 37-55. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-12180-8_2

The convenient city: smart urbanism for a resilient city. / Roggema, Rob.

Data-driven multivalence in the built environment. ed. / Nimish Biloria. Cham : Springer, 2020. p. 37-55.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapterProfessional

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Roggema R. The convenient city: smart urbanism for a resilient city. In Biloria N, editor, Data-driven multivalence in the built environment. Cham: Springer. 2020. p. 37-55 https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-030-12180-8_2