Social support and self-care in heart failure

Robyn Gallagher, Marie Louise Luttik, Tiny Jaarsma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Self-care by heart failure (HF) patients is essential for optimal disease management of their condition. However, as the nature of HF is unrelenting and burdensome, self-care is usually achieved with the support of partners. It is not clear what role the level of social support by partners plays in HF self-care; therefore, this study sets out to determine the types of social support provided to HF patients and the impact of differing levels of social support on HF patients' self-care.

SUBJECTS AND METHOD: This is secondary analysis of a subgroup of patients experiencing their second hospital admission for HF at baseline in the COACH study, a multisite trial conducted in the Netherlands. Measures included the European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour Scale and a multiple component assessment of social support, which categorized patients into low, moderate, and high levels of social support according to the presence of a partner and their perception of support they received from their partner.

RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Patients (n = 333) had an average age of 72 (SD, 11) years, and 92% belonged to New York Heart Association class III or greater. Of the patients with partners (56%), only 49% had a high level of support from their partner. No demographic or clinical characteristic was associated with self-care behavior. Patients with a high level of support reported significantly better self-care (P = .002) than patients with low or moderate levels of social support. Patients with a high level of social support reported being significantly more likely to consult with a health professional for weight gain (P = .011), to limit the amount of fluids they have (P = .02), take their medication (P = .017), to get a flu shot (P = .001), and to exercise on a regular basis (P < .001) than those with medium or low levels of social support. The presence of social support by a partner is not sufficient to influence HF patients' self-care. Social support provided by partners needs to be of a quality and content that matches HF patients' perception of need to influence self-care. Caregivers, especially partners, should be considered as integral in the treatment and care of HF patients.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)439-45
Number of pages7
JournalThe Journal of cardiovascular nursing
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 5 Mar 2011
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • aged
  • cross-sectional studies
  • exercise
  • female
  • health behavior
  • heart failure
  • humans
  • influenza vaccines
  • male
  • medication adherence
  • netherlands
  • patient acceptance of health care
  • patient readmission
  • self care
  • social support
  • spouses
  • journal article
  • multicenter study
  • randomized controlled trial
  • research support, non-U.S. Gov't

Cite this

Gallagher, Robyn ; Luttik, Marie Louise ; Jaarsma, Tiny. / Social support and self-care in heart failure. In: The Journal of cardiovascular nursing. 2011 ; Vol. 26, No. 6. pp. 439-45.
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abstract = "BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Self-care by heart failure (HF) patients is essential for optimal disease management of their condition. However, as the nature of HF is unrelenting and burdensome, self-care is usually achieved with the support of partners. It is not clear what role the level of social support by partners plays in HF self-care; therefore, this study sets out to determine the types of social support provided to HF patients and the impact of differing levels of social support on HF patients' self-care.SUBJECTS AND METHOD: This is secondary analysis of a subgroup of patients experiencing their second hospital admission for HF at baseline in the COACH study, a multisite trial conducted in the Netherlands. Measures included the European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour Scale and a multiple component assessment of social support, which categorized patients into low, moderate, and high levels of social support according to the presence of a partner and their perception of support they received from their partner.RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Patients (n = 333) had an average age of 72 (SD, 11) years, and 92{\%} belonged to New York Heart Association class III or greater. Of the patients with partners (56{\%}), only 49{\%} had a high level of support from their partner. No demographic or clinical characteristic was associated with self-care behavior. Patients with a high level of support reported significantly better self-care (P = .002) than patients with low or moderate levels of social support. Patients with a high level of social support reported being significantly more likely to consult with a health professional for weight gain (P = .011), to limit the amount of fluids they have (P = .02), take their medication (P = .017), to get a flu shot (P = .001), and to exercise on a regular basis (P < .001) than those with medium or low levels of social support. The presence of social support by a partner is not sufficient to influence HF patients' self-care. Social support provided by partners needs to be of a quality and content that matches HF patients' perception of need to influence self-care. Caregivers, especially partners, should be considered as integral in the treatment and care of HF patients.",
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Social support and self-care in heart failure. / Gallagher, Robyn; Luttik, Marie Louise; Jaarsma, Tiny.

In: The Journal of cardiovascular nursing, Vol. 26, No. 6, 05.03.2011, p. 439-45.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Social support and self-care in heart failure

AU - Gallagher, Robyn

AU - Luttik, Marie Louise

AU - Jaarsma, Tiny

PY - 2011/3/5

Y1 - 2011/3/5

N2 - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Self-care by heart failure (HF) patients is essential for optimal disease management of their condition. However, as the nature of HF is unrelenting and burdensome, self-care is usually achieved with the support of partners. It is not clear what role the level of social support by partners plays in HF self-care; therefore, this study sets out to determine the types of social support provided to HF patients and the impact of differing levels of social support on HF patients' self-care.SUBJECTS AND METHOD: This is secondary analysis of a subgroup of patients experiencing their second hospital admission for HF at baseline in the COACH study, a multisite trial conducted in the Netherlands. Measures included the European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour Scale and a multiple component assessment of social support, which categorized patients into low, moderate, and high levels of social support according to the presence of a partner and their perception of support they received from their partner.RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Patients (n = 333) had an average age of 72 (SD, 11) years, and 92% belonged to New York Heart Association class III or greater. Of the patients with partners (56%), only 49% had a high level of support from their partner. No demographic or clinical characteristic was associated with self-care behavior. Patients with a high level of support reported significantly better self-care (P = .002) than patients with low or moderate levels of social support. Patients with a high level of social support reported being significantly more likely to consult with a health professional for weight gain (P = .011), to limit the amount of fluids they have (P = .02), take their medication (P = .017), to get a flu shot (P = .001), and to exercise on a regular basis (P < .001) than those with medium or low levels of social support. The presence of social support by a partner is not sufficient to influence HF patients' self-care. Social support provided by partners needs to be of a quality and content that matches HF patients' perception of need to influence self-care. Caregivers, especially partners, should be considered as integral in the treatment and care of HF patients.

AB - BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Self-care by heart failure (HF) patients is essential for optimal disease management of their condition. However, as the nature of HF is unrelenting and burdensome, self-care is usually achieved with the support of partners. It is not clear what role the level of social support by partners plays in HF self-care; therefore, this study sets out to determine the types of social support provided to HF patients and the impact of differing levels of social support on HF patients' self-care.SUBJECTS AND METHOD: This is secondary analysis of a subgroup of patients experiencing their second hospital admission for HF at baseline in the COACH study, a multisite trial conducted in the Netherlands. Measures included the European Heart Failure Self-care Behaviour Scale and a multiple component assessment of social support, which categorized patients into low, moderate, and high levels of social support according to the presence of a partner and their perception of support they received from their partner.RESULTS AND CONCLUSIONS: Patients (n = 333) had an average age of 72 (SD, 11) years, and 92% belonged to New York Heart Association class III or greater. Of the patients with partners (56%), only 49% had a high level of support from their partner. No demographic or clinical characteristic was associated with self-care behavior. Patients with a high level of support reported significantly better self-care (P = .002) than patients with low or moderate levels of social support. Patients with a high level of social support reported being significantly more likely to consult with a health professional for weight gain (P = .011), to limit the amount of fluids they have (P = .02), take their medication (P = .017), to get a flu shot (P = .001), and to exercise on a regular basis (P < .001) than those with medium or low levels of social support. The presence of social support by a partner is not sufficient to influence HF patients' self-care. Social support provided by partners needs to be of a quality and content that matches HF patients' perception of need to influence self-care. Caregivers, especially partners, should be considered as integral in the treatment and care of HF patients.

KW - aged

KW - cross-sectional studies

KW - exercise

KW - female

KW - health behavior

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KW - influenza vaccines

KW - male

KW - medication adherence

KW - netherlands

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KW - self care

KW - social support

KW - spouses

KW - journal article

KW - multicenter study

KW - randomized controlled trial

KW - research support, non-U.S. Gov't

KW - bejaard

KW - cross-sectional studies

KW - oefening

KW - vrouwelijk

KW - gezondheidsgedrag

KW - hartfalen

KW - mensen

KW - influenza vaccins

KW - mannelijk

KW - medicatie aanhankelijkheid

KW - nederland

KW - patiënt acceptatie van gezondheidszorg

KW - opnieuw toelaten van een patiënt

KW - zelfzorgen

KW - sociale steun

KW - partners

KW - tijdschriftartikel

KW - multicenter study

KW - gerandomiseerd controle proces

KW - onderzoekshulp

U2 - 10.1097/JCN.0b013e31820984e1

DO - 10.1097/JCN.0b013e31820984e1

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VL - 26

SP - 439

EP - 445

JO - The Journal of cardiovascular nursing

JF - The Journal of cardiovascular nursing

SN - 0889-4655

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