Sizing Batteries for Power Flow Management in Distribution Grids: A Method to Compare Battery Capacities for Different Siting Configurations and Variable Power Flow Simultaneity

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Abstract

Battery energy storage (BES) can provide many grid services, such as power flow management to reduce distribution grid overloading. It is desirable to minimise BES storage capacities to reduce investment costs. However, it is not always clear how battery sizing is affected by battery siting and power flow simultaneity (PFS). This paper describes a method to compare the battery capacity required to provide grid services for different battery siting configurations and variable PFSs. The method was implemented by modelling a standard test grid with artificial power flow patterns and different battery siting configurations. The storage capacity of each configuration was minimised to determine how these variables affect the minimum storage capacity required to maintain power flows below a given threshold. In this case, a battery located at the transformer required 10–20% more capacity than a battery located centrally on the grid, or several batteries distributed throughout the grid, depending on PFS. The differences in capacity requirements were largely attributed to the ability of a BES configuration to mitigate network losses. The method presented in this paper can be used to compare BES capacity requirements for different battery siting configurations, power flow patterns, grid services, and grid characteristics.
Original languageEnglish
JournalEnergies
Volume16
Issue number22
Publication statusPublished - 17 Nov 2023

Keywords

  • battery energy storage
  • battery siting
  • battery sizing
  • distribution grids
  • modelling
  • power flow simultaneity
  • power flow management

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