Older patients’ motives of whether or not to perform self-management during a hospital stay and influencing factors

Caroline Otter (First author), Jita Hoogerduijn, Joost Keers, Ellen Ingrid Hagedoorn, Janneke de Man-van Ginkel, Marieke schuurmans

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Semi-structured in-depth interviews (n = 12) were held to explore older patients’ motives of whether or not to
perform self-management while hospitalized and to identify factors influencing self-management during hospitalization. These interviews were analyzed using the Quacol method. Self-management during hospitalization is operationalized as: collaboration with the nursing staff, having a proactive role, and having control over personal care. Three main themes, i.e., patients’ abilities, expectations and opinions, as well as their perceived behavior of nurses were identified along with eight influencing factors. Results indicate that older inpatients perform selfmanagement when they know that it impacts their recovery, when they perceive that a mistake is impending, when their own personal limits are exceeded, or when they are invited to self-manage by nurses.
This study provides several suggestions for developing interventions to support patients’ self-management during hospitalization.
Original languageEnglish
Article numberhttps://doi.org/10.1016/j.gerinurse.2018.10.004 0197-4572
Pages (from-to)205-211
JournalGeriatric nursing
Volume40
Issue number2
Publication statusPublished - 2019

Keywords

  • geriatry
  • hospital patients
  • self management

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