Motor learning strategies in basketball players and its implications for ACL injury prevention: a randomized controlled trial

Anne Benjaminse, Bert Otten, Alli Gokeler, Koen Lemmink

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Abstract

Purpose Adding external focus of attention (EF, focus on the movement effect) may optimize current anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programmes. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of an EF, by a visual stimulus and an internal focus, by a verbal stimulus during unexpected sidestep cutting in female and male athletes and how these effects remained over time. Methods Ninety experienced basketball athletes performed sidestep cutting manoeuvres in three sessions (S1, S2 and S3). In this randomized controlled trial, athletes were allocated to three groups: visual (VIS), verbal (VER) and control (CTRL). Kinematics and kinetics were collected at the time of peak knee frontal plane moment. Results Males in the VIS group showed a larger ver- tical ground reaction force (S1: 25.4 ± 3.1 N/kg, S2: 25.8 ± 2.9 N/kg, S3: 25.2 ± 3.2 N/kg) and knee flexion moments (S1: −3.8 ± 0.9 Nm/kg, S2: −4.0 ± 1.2 Nm/ kg, S3: −3.9 ± 1.3 Nm/kg) compared to the males in the VER and CTRL groups and to the females in the VIS group (p < 0.05). Additionally, the males in the VIS group reduced knee valgus moment and the females in the VER group reduced knee varus moment over time (n.s.). Conclusion Male subjects clearly benefit from visual feedback. Females may need different feedback modes to learn a correct movement pattern. Sex-specific learning preferences may have to be acknowledged in day by day practice. Adding video instruction or feedback to regular training regimens when teaching athletes safe movement patterns and providing individual feedback might target suboptimal long-term results and optimize ACL injury prevention programmes. Level of evidence I.

Keywords

  • acl
  • injury prevention
  • motor learning
  • attentional focus

Cite this

@article{ef6dca5b67a44f75b1816fe65fa5d927,
title = "Motor learning strategies in basketball players and its implications for ACL injury prevention: a randomized controlled trial",
abstract = "Purpose Adding external focus of attention (EF, focus on the movement effect) may optimize current anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programmes. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of an EF, by a visual stimulus and an internal focus, by a verbal stimulus during unexpected sidestep cutting in female and male athletes and how these effects remained over time. Methods Ninety experienced basketball athletes performed sidestep cutting manoeuvres in three sessions (S1, S2 and S3). In this randomized controlled trial, athletes were allocated to three groups: visual (VIS), verbal (VER) and control (CTRL). Kinematics and kinetics were collected at the time of peak knee frontal plane moment. Results Males in the VIS group showed a larger ver- tical ground reaction force (S1: 25.4 ± 3.1 N/kg, S2: 25.8 ± 2.9 N/kg, S3: 25.2 ± 3.2 N/kg) and knee flexion moments (S1: −3.8 ± 0.9 Nm/kg, S2: −4.0 ± 1.2 Nm/ kg, S3: −3.9 ± 1.3 Nm/kg) compared to the males in the VER and CTRL groups and to the females in the VIS group (p < 0.05). Additionally, the males in the VIS group reduced knee valgus moment and the females in the VER group reduced knee varus moment over time (n.s.). Conclusion Male subjects clearly benefit from visual feedback. Females may need different feedback modes to learn a correct movement pattern. Sex-specific learning preferences may have to be acknowledged in day by day practice. Adding video instruction or feedback to regular training regimens when teaching athletes safe movement patterns and providing individual feedback might target suboptimal long-term results and optimize ACL injury prevention programmes. Level of evidence I.",
keywords = "acl, injury prevention, motor learning, attentional focus, voorste kruisband, letselpreventie, letsel, preventie, motorisch leren, aandachtsfocus",
author = "Anne Benjaminse and Bert Otten and Alli Gokeler and Koen Lemmink",
year = "2017",
month = "8",
doi = "10.1007/s00167-015-3727-0",
language = "English",
volume = "25",
pages = "2365--2376",
journal = "Knee surgery, sports traumatology, arthroscopy : official journal of the European Society of Sports Traumatology, Knee Surgery and Arthroscopy",
issn = "1433-7347",
publisher = "Springer",
number = "8",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Motor learning strategies in basketball players and its implications for ACL injury prevention

T2 - a randomized controlled trial

AU - Benjaminse, Anne

AU - Otten, Bert

AU - Gokeler, Alli

AU - Lemmink, Koen

PY - 2017/8

Y1 - 2017/8

N2 - Purpose Adding external focus of attention (EF, focus on the movement effect) may optimize current anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programmes. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of an EF, by a visual stimulus and an internal focus, by a verbal stimulus during unexpected sidestep cutting in female and male athletes and how these effects remained over time. Methods Ninety experienced basketball athletes performed sidestep cutting manoeuvres in three sessions (S1, S2 and S3). In this randomized controlled trial, athletes were allocated to three groups: visual (VIS), verbal (VER) and control (CTRL). Kinematics and kinetics were collected at the time of peak knee frontal plane moment. Results Males in the VIS group showed a larger ver- tical ground reaction force (S1: 25.4 ± 3.1 N/kg, S2: 25.8 ± 2.9 N/kg, S3: 25.2 ± 3.2 N/kg) and knee flexion moments (S1: −3.8 ± 0.9 Nm/kg, S2: −4.0 ± 1.2 Nm/ kg, S3: −3.9 ± 1.3 Nm/kg) compared to the males in the VER and CTRL groups and to the females in the VIS group (p < 0.05). Additionally, the males in the VIS group reduced knee valgus moment and the females in the VER group reduced knee varus moment over time (n.s.). Conclusion Male subjects clearly benefit from visual feedback. Females may need different feedback modes to learn a correct movement pattern. Sex-specific learning preferences may have to be acknowledged in day by day practice. Adding video instruction or feedback to regular training regimens when teaching athletes safe movement patterns and providing individual feedback might target suboptimal long-term results and optimize ACL injury prevention programmes. Level of evidence I.

AB - Purpose Adding external focus of attention (EF, focus on the movement effect) may optimize current anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury prevention programmes. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of an EF, by a visual stimulus and an internal focus, by a verbal stimulus during unexpected sidestep cutting in female and male athletes and how these effects remained over time. Methods Ninety experienced basketball athletes performed sidestep cutting manoeuvres in three sessions (S1, S2 and S3). In this randomized controlled trial, athletes were allocated to three groups: visual (VIS), verbal (VER) and control (CTRL). Kinematics and kinetics were collected at the time of peak knee frontal plane moment. Results Males in the VIS group showed a larger ver- tical ground reaction force (S1: 25.4 ± 3.1 N/kg, S2: 25.8 ± 2.9 N/kg, S3: 25.2 ± 3.2 N/kg) and knee flexion moments (S1: −3.8 ± 0.9 Nm/kg, S2: −4.0 ± 1.2 Nm/ kg, S3: −3.9 ± 1.3 Nm/kg) compared to the males in the VER and CTRL groups and to the females in the VIS group (p < 0.05). Additionally, the males in the VIS group reduced knee valgus moment and the females in the VER group reduced knee varus moment over time (n.s.). Conclusion Male subjects clearly benefit from visual feedback. Females may need different feedback modes to learn a correct movement pattern. Sex-specific learning preferences may have to be acknowledged in day by day practice. Adding video instruction or feedback to regular training regimens when teaching athletes safe movement patterns and providing individual feedback might target suboptimal long-term results and optimize ACL injury prevention programmes. Level of evidence I.

KW - acl

KW - injury prevention

KW - motor learning

KW - attentional focus

KW - voorste kruisband

KW - letselpreventie

KW - letsel

KW - preventie

KW - motorisch leren

KW - aandachtsfocus

UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/motor-learning-strategies-basketball-players-implications-acl-injury-prevention-randomized-controlle

U2 - 10.1007/s00167-015-3727-0

DO - 10.1007/s00167-015-3727-0

M3 - Article

VL - 25

SP - 2365

EP - 2376

JO - Knee surgery, sports traumatology, arthroscopy : official journal of the European Society of Sports Traumatology, Knee Surgery and Arthroscopy

JF - Knee surgery, sports traumatology, arthroscopy : official journal of the European Society of Sports Traumatology, Knee Surgery and Arthroscopy

SN - 1433-7347

IS - 8

ER -