Monitoring training progress during exercise training in cancer survivors: a submaximal exercise test as an alternative for a maximal exercise test?

Anne M May, Ellen van Weert, Irene Korstjens, Josette E Hoekstra-Weebers, Cees van der Schans, Maria L Zonderland, Ilse Mesters, Bart van den Borne, Wynand J Ros

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: To examine the use of a submaximal exercise test in detecting change in fitness level after a physical training program, and to investigate the correlation of outcomes as measured submaximally or maximally.

DESIGN: A prospective study in which exercise testing was performed before and after training intervention.

SETTING: Academic and general hospital and rehabilitation center.

PARTICIPANTS: Cancer survivors (N=147) (all cancer types, medical treatment completed > or =3 mo ago) attended a 12-week supervised exercise program.

INTERVENTIONS: A 12-week training program including aerobic training, strength training, and group sport.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Outcome measures were changes in peak oxygen uptake (Vo(2)peak) and peak power output (both determined during exhaustive exercise testing) and submaximal heart rate (determined during submaximal testing at a fixed workload).

RESULTS: The Vo(2)peak and peak power output increased and the submaximal heart rate decreased significantly from baseline to postintervention (P<.001). Changes in submaximal heart rate were only weakly correlated with changes in Vo(2)peak and peak power output. Comparing the participants performing submaximal testing with a heart rate less than 140 beats per minute (bpm) versus the participants achieving a heart rate of 140 bpm or higher showed that changes in submaximal heart rate in the group cycling with moderate to high intensity (ie, heart rate > or =140 bpm) were clearly related to changes in VO(2)peak and peak power output.

CONCLUSIONS: For the monitoring of training progress in daily clinical practice, changes in heart rate at a fixed submaximal workload that requires a heart rate greater than 140 bpm may serve as an alternative to an exhaustive exercise test.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)351-357
JournalArchives of physical medicine and rehabilitation
Volume91
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2010

Keywords

  • exercise test
  • exercise therapy
  • female
  • heart rate
  • humans
  • male
  • middle aged
  • neoplasms
  • oxygen consumption
  • physical fitness
  • prospective studies
  • resistance training
  • treatment outcome

Cite this

May, Anne M ; van Weert, Ellen ; Korstjens, Irene ; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E ; van der Schans, Cees ; Zonderland, Maria L ; Mesters, Ilse ; van den Borne, Bart ; Ros, Wynand J. / Monitoring training progress during exercise training in cancer survivors : a submaximal exercise test as an alternative for a maximal exercise test?. In: Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation. 2010 ; Vol. 91, No. 3. pp. 351-357.
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title = "Monitoring training progress during exercise training in cancer survivors: a submaximal exercise test as an alternative for a maximal exercise test?",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: To examine the use of a submaximal exercise test in detecting change in fitness level after a physical training program, and to investigate the correlation of outcomes as measured submaximally or maximally.DESIGN: A prospective study in which exercise testing was performed before and after training intervention.SETTING: Academic and general hospital and rehabilitation center.PARTICIPANTS: Cancer survivors (N=147) (all cancer types, medical treatment completed > or =3 mo ago) attended a 12-week supervised exercise program.INTERVENTIONS: A 12-week training program including aerobic training, strength training, and group sport.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Outcome measures were changes in peak oxygen uptake (Vo(2)peak) and peak power output (both determined during exhaustive exercise testing) and submaximal heart rate (determined during submaximal testing at a fixed workload).RESULTS: The Vo(2)peak and peak power output increased and the submaximal heart rate decreased significantly from baseline to postintervention (P<.001). Changes in submaximal heart rate were only weakly correlated with changes in Vo(2)peak and peak power output. Comparing the participants performing submaximal testing with a heart rate less than 140 beats per minute (bpm) versus the participants achieving a heart rate of 140 bpm or higher showed that changes in submaximal heart rate in the group cycling with moderate to high intensity (ie, heart rate > or =140 bpm) were clearly related to changes in VO(2)peak and peak power output.CONCLUSIONS: For the monitoring of training progress in daily clinical practice, changes in heart rate at a fixed submaximal workload that requires a heart rate greater than 140 bpm may serve as an alternative to an exhaustive exercise test.",
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Monitoring training progress during exercise training in cancer survivors : a submaximal exercise test as an alternative for a maximal exercise test? / May, Anne M; van Weert, Ellen; Korstjens, Irene; Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E; van der Schans, Cees; Zonderland, Maria L; Mesters, Ilse; van den Borne, Bart; Ros, Wynand J.

In: Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation, Vol. 91, No. 3, 03.2010, p. 351-357.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

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T1 - Monitoring training progress during exercise training in cancer survivors

T2 - a submaximal exercise test as an alternative for a maximal exercise test?

AU - May, Anne M

AU - van Weert, Ellen

AU - Korstjens, Irene

AU - Hoekstra-Weebers, Josette E

AU - van der Schans, Cees

AU - Zonderland, Maria L

AU - Mesters, Ilse

AU - van den Borne, Bart

AU - Ros, Wynand J

N1 - Copyright 2010 American Congress of Rehabilitation Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2010/3

Y1 - 2010/3

N2 - OBJECTIVE: To examine the use of a submaximal exercise test in detecting change in fitness level after a physical training program, and to investigate the correlation of outcomes as measured submaximally or maximally.DESIGN: A prospective study in which exercise testing was performed before and after training intervention.SETTING: Academic and general hospital and rehabilitation center.PARTICIPANTS: Cancer survivors (N=147) (all cancer types, medical treatment completed > or =3 mo ago) attended a 12-week supervised exercise program.INTERVENTIONS: A 12-week training program including aerobic training, strength training, and group sport.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Outcome measures were changes in peak oxygen uptake (Vo(2)peak) and peak power output (both determined during exhaustive exercise testing) and submaximal heart rate (determined during submaximal testing at a fixed workload).RESULTS: The Vo(2)peak and peak power output increased and the submaximal heart rate decreased significantly from baseline to postintervention (P<.001). Changes in submaximal heart rate were only weakly correlated with changes in Vo(2)peak and peak power output. Comparing the participants performing submaximal testing with a heart rate less than 140 beats per minute (bpm) versus the participants achieving a heart rate of 140 bpm or higher showed that changes in submaximal heart rate in the group cycling with moderate to high intensity (ie, heart rate > or =140 bpm) were clearly related to changes in VO(2)peak and peak power output.CONCLUSIONS: For the monitoring of training progress in daily clinical practice, changes in heart rate at a fixed submaximal workload that requires a heart rate greater than 140 bpm may serve as an alternative to an exhaustive exercise test.

AB - OBJECTIVE: To examine the use of a submaximal exercise test in detecting change in fitness level after a physical training program, and to investigate the correlation of outcomes as measured submaximally or maximally.DESIGN: A prospective study in which exercise testing was performed before and after training intervention.SETTING: Academic and general hospital and rehabilitation center.PARTICIPANTS: Cancer survivors (N=147) (all cancer types, medical treatment completed > or =3 mo ago) attended a 12-week supervised exercise program.INTERVENTIONS: A 12-week training program including aerobic training, strength training, and group sport.MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Outcome measures were changes in peak oxygen uptake (Vo(2)peak) and peak power output (both determined during exhaustive exercise testing) and submaximal heart rate (determined during submaximal testing at a fixed workload).RESULTS: The Vo(2)peak and peak power output increased and the submaximal heart rate decreased significantly from baseline to postintervention (P<.001). Changes in submaximal heart rate were only weakly correlated with changes in Vo(2)peak and peak power output. Comparing the participants performing submaximal testing with a heart rate less than 140 beats per minute (bpm) versus the participants achieving a heart rate of 140 bpm or higher showed that changes in submaximal heart rate in the group cycling with moderate to high intensity (ie, heart rate > or =140 bpm) were clearly related to changes in VO(2)peak and peak power output.CONCLUSIONS: For the monitoring of training progress in daily clinical practice, changes in heart rate at a fixed submaximal workload that requires a heart rate greater than 140 bpm may serve as an alternative to an exhaustive exercise test.

KW - exercise test

KW - exercise therapy

KW - female

KW - heart rate

KW - humans

KW - male

KW - middle aged

KW - neoplasms

KW - oxygen consumption

KW - physical fitness

KW - prospective studies

KW - resistance training

KW - treatment outcome

KW - oefeningstest

KW - oefeningstherapie

KW - vrouwelijk

KW - hartslag

KW - mensen

KW - mannelijk

KW - middelbaar

KW - neoplasma's

KW - zuurstofconsumptie

KW - fysieke fitheid

KW - prospectieve studies

KW - weerstandstraining

KW - overlevers

KW - behandelingsresultaat

KW - evaluatie studies

KW - tijdchriftartikel

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DO - 10.1016/j.apmr.2009.11.018

M3 - Article

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SP - 351

EP - 357

JO - Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation

JF - Archives of physical medicine and rehabilitation

SN - 0003-9993

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ER -