Influence of frequent nocturnal home hemodialysis on food preference

Karin Ipema, Casper Franssen, Cees van der Schans, Lianne Smit, Sabine Noordman, Hinke Haisma

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

OBJECTIVE: Dialysis patients frequently report a change of taste that is reversible after renal transplantation, suggesting that uremic toxins may negatively influence taste. Currently, frequent nocturnal home hemodialysis (NHHD) is the most effective method of hemodialysis, and is associated with the lowest levels of uremic toxins. We studied preferences for various foods as an indicator of taste perception. We questioned whether food preference differs between NHHD patients and those on conventional hemodialysis.

DESIGN AND PATIENTS: In this transverse, cross-sectional pilot study, we assessed food preference by means of a questionnaire for patients on NHHD (n=6; 8 hours of dialysis per night, for 5 or 6 nights a week) and 3 age-matched and sex-matched control groups: chronic home hemodialysis patients (HHD; n=9; 4 to 5 hours of dialysis per day, 3 days a week), chronic in-center hemodialysis patients (CHD; n=18; 4 to 5 hours of dialysis per day, 3 days a week), and healthy control subjects (HC; n=23).

RESULTS: Mean scores for food preference did not differ between groups (P=.32). Similarly, the preference for product groups did not differ between groups. On an individual product level, we found only minor differences. The NHHD patients had a preference for savory snacks, as did the HC and CHD groups, whereas the HHD group had a preference for sweet snacks (P < .05). Hemodialysis patients reported dry mouth more often than did the HC patients (P < .05).

CONCLUSIONS: Frequent NHHD has no major impact on food preference. The change in taste reported by NHHD patients is not related to their particular food preferences.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)127-133
JournalJournal of renal nutrition : the official journal of the Council on Renal Nutrition of the National Kidney Foundation
Volume20
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2010

Keywords

  • hemodialysis
  • nutrition

Cite this

@article{7386e88ba3524f80afc45f235b39103e,
title = "Influence of frequent nocturnal home hemodialysis on food preference",
abstract = "OBJECTIVE: Dialysis patients frequently report a change of taste that is reversible after renal transplantation, suggesting that uremic toxins may negatively influence taste. Currently, frequent nocturnal home hemodialysis (NHHD) is the most effective method of hemodialysis, and is associated with the lowest levels of uremic toxins. We studied preferences for various foods as an indicator of taste perception. We questioned whether food preference differs between NHHD patients and those on conventional hemodialysis.DESIGN AND PATIENTS: In this transverse, cross-sectional pilot study, we assessed food preference by means of a questionnaire for patients on NHHD (n=6; 8 hours of dialysis per night, for 5 or 6 nights a week) and 3 age-matched and sex-matched control groups: chronic home hemodialysis patients (HHD; n=9; 4 to 5 hours of dialysis per day, 3 days a week), chronic in-center hemodialysis patients (CHD; n=18; 4 to 5 hours of dialysis per day, 3 days a week), and healthy control subjects (HC; n=23).RESULTS: Mean scores for food preference did not differ between groups (P=.32). Similarly, the preference for product groups did not differ between groups. On an individual product level, we found only minor differences. The NHHD patients had a preference for savory snacks, as did the HC and CHD groups, whereas the HHD group had a preference for sweet snacks (P < .05). Hemodialysis patients reported dry mouth more often than did the HC patients (P < .05).CONCLUSIONS: Frequent NHHD has no major impact on food preference. The change in taste reported by NHHD patients is not related to their particular food preferences.",
keywords = "hemodialysis, nutrition, hemodialyse, voeding",
author = "Karin Ipema and Casper Franssen and {van der Schans}, Cees and Lianne Smit and Sabine Noordman and Hinke Haisma",
note = "Copyright (c) 2010 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.",
year = "2010",
month = "3",
doi = "10.1053/j.jrn.2009.04.007",
language = "English",
volume = "20",
pages = "127--133",
journal = "Journal of renal nutrition : the official journal of the Council on Renal Nutrition of the National Kidney Foundation",
issn = "1051-2276",
publisher = "W.B. Saunders Ltd",
number = "2",

}

Influence of frequent nocturnal home hemodialysis on food preference. / Ipema, Karin; Franssen, Casper; van der Schans, Cees; Smit, Lianne; Noordman, Sabine; Haisma, Hinke.

In: Journal of renal nutrition : the official journal of the Council on Renal Nutrition of the National Kidney Foundation, Vol. 20, No. 2, 03.2010, p. 127-133.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

TY - JOUR

T1 - Influence of frequent nocturnal home hemodialysis on food preference

AU - Ipema, Karin

AU - Franssen, Casper

AU - van der Schans, Cees

AU - Smit, Lianne

AU - Noordman, Sabine

AU - Haisma, Hinke

N1 - Copyright (c) 2010 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

PY - 2010/3

Y1 - 2010/3

N2 - OBJECTIVE: Dialysis patients frequently report a change of taste that is reversible after renal transplantation, suggesting that uremic toxins may negatively influence taste. Currently, frequent nocturnal home hemodialysis (NHHD) is the most effective method of hemodialysis, and is associated with the lowest levels of uremic toxins. We studied preferences for various foods as an indicator of taste perception. We questioned whether food preference differs between NHHD patients and those on conventional hemodialysis.DESIGN AND PATIENTS: In this transverse, cross-sectional pilot study, we assessed food preference by means of a questionnaire for patients on NHHD (n=6; 8 hours of dialysis per night, for 5 or 6 nights a week) and 3 age-matched and sex-matched control groups: chronic home hemodialysis patients (HHD; n=9; 4 to 5 hours of dialysis per day, 3 days a week), chronic in-center hemodialysis patients (CHD; n=18; 4 to 5 hours of dialysis per day, 3 days a week), and healthy control subjects (HC; n=23).RESULTS: Mean scores for food preference did not differ between groups (P=.32). Similarly, the preference for product groups did not differ between groups. On an individual product level, we found only minor differences. The NHHD patients had a preference for savory snacks, as did the HC and CHD groups, whereas the HHD group had a preference for sweet snacks (P < .05). Hemodialysis patients reported dry mouth more often than did the HC patients (P < .05).CONCLUSIONS: Frequent NHHD has no major impact on food preference. The change in taste reported by NHHD patients is not related to their particular food preferences.

AB - OBJECTIVE: Dialysis patients frequently report a change of taste that is reversible after renal transplantation, suggesting that uremic toxins may negatively influence taste. Currently, frequent nocturnal home hemodialysis (NHHD) is the most effective method of hemodialysis, and is associated with the lowest levels of uremic toxins. We studied preferences for various foods as an indicator of taste perception. We questioned whether food preference differs between NHHD patients and those on conventional hemodialysis.DESIGN AND PATIENTS: In this transverse, cross-sectional pilot study, we assessed food preference by means of a questionnaire for patients on NHHD (n=6; 8 hours of dialysis per night, for 5 or 6 nights a week) and 3 age-matched and sex-matched control groups: chronic home hemodialysis patients (HHD; n=9; 4 to 5 hours of dialysis per day, 3 days a week), chronic in-center hemodialysis patients (CHD; n=18; 4 to 5 hours of dialysis per day, 3 days a week), and healthy control subjects (HC; n=23).RESULTS: Mean scores for food preference did not differ between groups (P=.32). Similarly, the preference for product groups did not differ between groups. On an individual product level, we found only minor differences. The NHHD patients had a preference for savory snacks, as did the HC and CHD groups, whereas the HHD group had a preference for sweet snacks (P < .05). Hemodialysis patients reported dry mouth more often than did the HC patients (P < .05).CONCLUSIONS: Frequent NHHD has no major impact on food preference. The change in taste reported by NHHD patients is not related to their particular food preferences.

KW - hemodialysis

KW - nutrition

KW - hemodialyse

KW - voeding

U2 - 10.1053/j.jrn.2009.04.007

DO - 10.1053/j.jrn.2009.04.007

M3 - Article

VL - 20

SP - 127

EP - 133

JO - Journal of renal nutrition : the official journal of the Council on Renal Nutrition of the National Kidney Foundation

JF - Journal of renal nutrition : the official journal of the Council on Renal Nutrition of the National Kidney Foundation

SN - 1051-2276

IS - 2

ER -