Diagnostic profiles for precision medicine in systemic sclerosis: stepping forward from single biomarkers towards pathophysiological panels

Ruben L. Smeets, Brigit E. Kersten, Irma Joosten, Charlotte Kaffa, Wynand Alkema, Hans J.P.M. Koenen, Madelon C. Vonk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is an autoimmune disease which is characterized by vasculopathy, tissue fibrosis and activation of the innate and adaptive immune system. Clinical features of the disease consists of skin thickening and internal organ involvement. Due to the heterogeneous nature of the disease it is difficult to predict disease progression and complications. Despite the discovery of novel autoantibodies associated with SSc, there is an unmet need for biomarkers for diagnosis, disease progression and response to treatment. To date, the use of single (surrogate) biomarkers for these purposes has been unsuccessful. Combining multiple biomarkers in to predictive panels or ultimately algorithms could be more precise. Given the limited therapeutic options and poor prognosis of many SSc patients, a better understanding of the immune-pathofysiological profiles might aid to an adjusted therapeutic approach. Therefore, we set out to explore immunological fingerprints in various clinically defined forms of SSc. We used multilayer profiling to identify unique immune profiles underlying distinct autoantibody signatures. These immune profiles could fill the unmet need for prognosis and response to therapy in SSc. Here, we present 3 pathophysiological fingerprints in SSc based on the expression of circulating antibodies, vascular markers and immunomodulatory mediators.
Original languageEnglish
Article number102515
JournalAutoimmunity reviews
Volume19
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 May 2020

Keywords

  • systemic sclerosis
  • autoimmune diseases

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