Comparison of level of cognitive process between case-based items and non-case-based items of the interuniversity progress test of medicine in the Netherlands

Dario Cecilio-Fernandes, Wouter Kerdijk, Andreas Johannes Bremers, Wytze Aalders, René Anton Tio

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    Abstract

    PURPOSE: It is assumed that case-based questions require higher order cognitive processing, whereas questions that are not case-based require lower order cognitive processing. In this study, we investigated to what extent case-based questions and questions that are not case-based, relate to Bloom's taxonomy.

    METHODS: In this article, 4800 questions of the Progress Test were classified whether it was a case-based question and the level of Bloom's taxonomy. Lower-order questions require students to remember or/and basically understand the knowledge. Higher-order questions require students to apply, analyze, or/and evaluate. A phi-coefficient was calculated to investigate the relations between the presence of case-based questions and the required level of cognitive processing.

    RESULTS: Our results demonstrated that case-based questions were measuring higher levels of cognitive processing in 98.1% of the questions. Of the non-case-based questions, 33.7% required a higher level of cognitive processing. The phi-coefficient demonstrated a significant moderate correlation between the presence of a patient case in a question and its required level of cognitive processing (phi-coefficient = 0.55, p<0.001).

    CONCLUSION: Medical teachers should be aware of the association between item formats (case-based versus non-case-based) and the cognitive processes they elicit in order to meet a certain balance in a test, taking the learning objectives as well as the test difficulty into account.

    Original languageEnglish
    JournalJournal of educational evaluation for health professions
    Volume15
    DOIs
    Publication statusPublished - 13 Dec 2018

    Keywords

    • cognition
    • comprehension
    • medical education
    • learning
    • memory
    • netherlands
    • problem solving

    Cite this

    @article{ecb0f9e6430248ea80cb005002c9470c,
    title = "Comparison of level of cognitive process between case-based items and non-case-based items of the interuniversity progress test of medicine in the Netherlands",
    abstract = "PURPOSE: It is assumed that case-based questions require higher order cognitive processing, whereas questions that are not case-based require lower order cognitive processing. In this study, we investigated to what extent case-based questions and questions that are not case-based, relate to Bloom's taxonomy.METHODS: In this article, 4800 questions of the Progress Test were classified whether it was a case-based question and the level of Bloom's taxonomy. Lower-order questions require students to remember or/and basically understand the knowledge. Higher-order questions require students to apply, analyze, or/and evaluate. A phi-coefficient was calculated to investigate the relations between the presence of case-based questions and the required level of cognitive processing.RESULTS: Our results demonstrated that case-based questions were measuring higher levels of cognitive processing in 98.1{\%} of the questions. Of the non-case-based questions, 33.7{\%} required a higher level of cognitive processing. The phi-coefficient demonstrated a significant moderate correlation between the presence of a patient case in a question and its required level of cognitive processing (phi-coefficient = 0.55, p<0.001).CONCLUSION: Medical teachers should be aware of the association between item formats (case-based versus non-case-based) and the cognitive processes they elicit in order to meet a certain balance in a test, taking the learning objectives as well as the test difficulty into account.",
    keywords = "cognition, comprehension, medical education, learning, memory, netherlands, problem solving, medisch onderwijs",
    author = "Dario Cecilio-Fernandes and Wouter Kerdijk and Bremers, {Andreas Johannes} and Wytze Aalders and Tio, {Ren{\'e} Anton}",
    year = "2018",
    month = "12",
    day = "13",
    doi = "10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.28",
    language = "English",
    volume = "15",
    journal = "Journal of educational evaluation for health professions",
    issn = "1975-5937",
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    }

    Comparison of level of cognitive process between case-based items and non-case-based items of the interuniversity progress test of medicine in the Netherlands. / Cecilio-Fernandes, Dario; Kerdijk, Wouter; Bremers, Andreas Johannes; Aalders, Wytze; Tio, René Anton.

    In: Journal of educational evaluation for health professions, Vol. 15, 13.12.2018.

    Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

    TY - JOUR

    T1 - Comparison of level of cognitive process between case-based items and non-case-based items of the interuniversity progress test of medicine in the Netherlands

    AU - Cecilio-Fernandes, Dario

    AU - Kerdijk, Wouter

    AU - Bremers, Andreas Johannes

    AU - Aalders, Wytze

    AU - Tio, René Anton

    PY - 2018/12/13

    Y1 - 2018/12/13

    N2 - PURPOSE: It is assumed that case-based questions require higher order cognitive processing, whereas questions that are not case-based require lower order cognitive processing. In this study, we investigated to what extent case-based questions and questions that are not case-based, relate to Bloom's taxonomy.METHODS: In this article, 4800 questions of the Progress Test were classified whether it was a case-based question and the level of Bloom's taxonomy. Lower-order questions require students to remember or/and basically understand the knowledge. Higher-order questions require students to apply, analyze, or/and evaluate. A phi-coefficient was calculated to investigate the relations between the presence of case-based questions and the required level of cognitive processing.RESULTS: Our results demonstrated that case-based questions were measuring higher levels of cognitive processing in 98.1% of the questions. Of the non-case-based questions, 33.7% required a higher level of cognitive processing. The phi-coefficient demonstrated a significant moderate correlation between the presence of a patient case in a question and its required level of cognitive processing (phi-coefficient = 0.55, p<0.001).CONCLUSION: Medical teachers should be aware of the association between item formats (case-based versus non-case-based) and the cognitive processes they elicit in order to meet a certain balance in a test, taking the learning objectives as well as the test difficulty into account.

    AB - PURPOSE: It is assumed that case-based questions require higher order cognitive processing, whereas questions that are not case-based require lower order cognitive processing. In this study, we investigated to what extent case-based questions and questions that are not case-based, relate to Bloom's taxonomy.METHODS: In this article, 4800 questions of the Progress Test were classified whether it was a case-based question and the level of Bloom's taxonomy. Lower-order questions require students to remember or/and basically understand the knowledge. Higher-order questions require students to apply, analyze, or/and evaluate. A phi-coefficient was calculated to investigate the relations between the presence of case-based questions and the required level of cognitive processing.RESULTS: Our results demonstrated that case-based questions were measuring higher levels of cognitive processing in 98.1% of the questions. Of the non-case-based questions, 33.7% required a higher level of cognitive processing. The phi-coefficient demonstrated a significant moderate correlation between the presence of a patient case in a question and its required level of cognitive processing (phi-coefficient = 0.55, p<0.001).CONCLUSION: Medical teachers should be aware of the association between item formats (case-based versus non-case-based) and the cognitive processes they elicit in order to meet a certain balance in a test, taking the learning objectives as well as the test difficulty into account.

    KW - cognition

    KW - comprehension

    KW - medical education

    KW - learning

    KW - memory

    KW - netherlands

    KW - problem solving

    KW - medisch onderwijs

    UR - http://www.mendeley.com/research/comparison-level-cognitive-processing-between-casebased-items-noncasebased-items-interuniversity-pro

    U2 - 10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.28

    DO - 10.3352/jeehp.2018.15.28

    M3 - Article

    VL - 15

    JO - Journal of educational evaluation for health professions

    JF - Journal of educational evaluation for health professions

    SN - 1975-5937

    ER -