Barrier-belief lifestyle counseling in primary care: a randomized controlled trial of efficacy.

Abstract

Background: Intervening on barrier beliefs will handle potential causes of relapse and inhibit the role of beliefs as mediating factors in lifestyle behavior. Purpose: Analyze the effects of a barrier-belief counseling intervention, including a set of cognitive and behavioral strategies, compared with a standard lifestyle intervention and a non-treated hanging control group. Methods: A multicenter randomized controlled trial, with balanced randomization, was conducted in a primary care setting in inactive adults (aged 18-70) in different intervention groups with a duration of 6 months: a barrier-belief counseling intervention (n=123) and a standard group intervention (n=122). The non-treated hanging control group (n=36) received no intervention. Physical activity, diet and quality of life were measured with follow-ups at 6, 12 and 18 months. Differences between intervention effects on outcomes were analyzed using a multiple regression analysis. Missing data was imputed with the predictive mean matching method combined with the last carried-forward method. Results: A barrier-belief counseling intervention was significantly (p<.01) more effective on physical activity in the short and the long term compared with the standard lifestyle group intervention and control group, and improved physical activity in the short term significantly (p<.05) with small effect sizes, diet in the short and the long term with small and moderate effect sizes respectively, and quality of life in the short and the long term with a moderate effect size. Conclusions: A barrier-belief approach can be seen as an effective lifestyle counseling intervention also on the long term and seems promising for implementation in healthcare practice.
Original languageEnglish
JournalAnnals of behavioral medicine
StateSubmitted - 2017

Fingerprint

Life Style
Counseling
Primary Health Care
Randomized Controlled Trials

Keywords

  • health care
  • life style

Cite this

@article{95ca91503a7a44d48018098a685f3d57,
title = "Barrier-belief lifestyle counseling in primary care: a randomized controlled trial of efficacy.",
keywords = "health care, life style, gezondheidszorg, leefstijl",
author = "Adrie Bouma",
year = "2017",
journal = "Annals of behavioral medicine",
issn = "0883-6612",
publisher = "Springer New York",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Barrier-belief lifestyle counseling in primary care: a randomized controlled trial of efficacy.

AU - Bouma,Adrie

PY - 2017

Y1 - 2017

N2 - Background: Intervening on barrier beliefs will handle potential causes of relapse and inhibit the role of beliefs as mediating factors in lifestyle behavior. Purpose: Analyze the effects of a barrier-belief counseling intervention, including a set of cognitive and behavioral strategies, compared with a standard lifestyle intervention and a non-treated hanging control group. Methods: A multicenter randomized controlled trial, with balanced randomization, was conducted in a primary care setting in inactive adults (aged 18-70) in different intervention groups with a duration of 6 months: a barrier-belief counseling intervention (n=123) and a standard group intervention (n=122). The non-treated hanging control group (n=36) received no intervention. Physical activity, diet and quality of life were measured with follow-ups at 6, 12 and 18 months. Differences between intervention effects on outcomes were analyzed using a multiple regression analysis. Missing data was imputed with the predictive mean matching method combined with the last carried-forward method. Results: A barrier-belief counseling intervention was significantly (p<.01) more effective on physical activity in the short and the long term compared with the standard lifestyle group intervention and control group, and improved physical activity in the short term significantly (p<.05) with small effect sizes, diet in the short and the long term with small and moderate effect sizes respectively, and quality of life in the short and the long term with a moderate effect size. Conclusions: A barrier-belief approach can be seen as an effective lifestyle counseling intervention also on the long term and seems promising for implementation in healthcare practice.

AB - Background: Intervening on barrier beliefs will handle potential causes of relapse and inhibit the role of beliefs as mediating factors in lifestyle behavior. Purpose: Analyze the effects of a barrier-belief counseling intervention, including a set of cognitive and behavioral strategies, compared with a standard lifestyle intervention and a non-treated hanging control group. Methods: A multicenter randomized controlled trial, with balanced randomization, was conducted in a primary care setting in inactive adults (aged 18-70) in different intervention groups with a duration of 6 months: a barrier-belief counseling intervention (n=123) and a standard group intervention (n=122). The non-treated hanging control group (n=36) received no intervention. Physical activity, diet and quality of life were measured with follow-ups at 6, 12 and 18 months. Differences between intervention effects on outcomes were analyzed using a multiple regression analysis. Missing data was imputed with the predictive mean matching method combined with the last carried-forward method. Results: A barrier-belief counseling intervention was significantly (p<.01) more effective on physical activity in the short and the long term compared with the standard lifestyle group intervention and control group, and improved physical activity in the short term significantly (p<.05) with small effect sizes, diet in the short and the long term with small and moderate effect sizes respectively, and quality of life in the short and the long term with a moderate effect size. Conclusions: A barrier-belief approach can be seen as an effective lifestyle counseling intervention also on the long term and seems promising for implementation in healthcare practice.

KW - health care

KW - life style

KW - gezondheidszorg

KW - leefstijl

M3 - Article

JO - Annals of behavioral medicine

T2 - Annals of behavioral medicine

JF - Annals of behavioral medicine

SN - 0883-6612

ER -