Are suspected auditory processing difficulties in children aged 8–12 years related to attention, working memory, nonverbal intelligence, and communication abilities?

Ellen de Wit, Pim van Dijk, B. Steenbergen, Cees van der Schans, Margreet Luinge

Abstract

Background: Children with difficulties in listening and understanding speech despite normal peripheral hearing, can be diagnosed with the diagnosis Auditory Processing Disorder (A). However, there are doubts about the validity of this diagnosis. The aim of this study was to examine the relation between the listening difficulties of children between 8 and 12 years with suspected A and the attention, working memory, nonverbal intelligence and communication abilities of these children.
Material and methods: In this case-control study we examined 10 children who reported listening difficulties in spite of normal peripheral hearing (3 referred by speech-language pathologist in the Northern Netherlands, 6 by an audiological center in the Southern Netherlands and one by parental concern) and 21 typically developing children (recruitment through word of mouth and by the website Taalexpert.nl), ages 8;0 to 12;0 years. The parents of all children completed three questionnaires about history, behavioral symptoms of ADHD, and communication skills (Children’s Communication Checklist). Teachers of the children completed the Children’s Auditory Processing Performance Scale (CHAPPS). Children were assessed for auditory processing abilities (speech-in-noise, filtered speech, binaural fusion, dichotic listening), nonverbal intelligence (Raven’s Coloured Progressive Matrices), and working memory (Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals). Auditory and visual attention was studied with four behavioral tests of the WAFF battery of the Vienna Test System (Schuhfried).
Results: Preliminary analysis shows no differences between groups on the auditory processing tests and nonverbal intelligence quotient. Children in the experimental group have poorer communication performance (parent report), poorer listening skills (teacher report), and poorer working memory and attention skills (behavioral tests).
Conclusions: The results of this study showed that there is a difference between children with listening complaints and typically developing children, but that the problems are not specific to the auditory modality. There seems to be no evidence for the validity of an auditory deficit.
Original languageEnglish
Pages84-85
StatePublished - 8 Jun 2017
Event - Interlaken, Switzerland

Conference

Conference13th Congress of the European Federation of Audiology Societies 2017
CountrySwitzerland
CityInterlaken
Period7/06/1710/06/17
Internet address

Fingerprint

Nonverbal Communication
Intelligence
Short-Term Memory
Communication
Netherlands
Hearing
Auditory Perceptual Disorders
Crows
Behavioral Symptoms
Intelligence Tests
Checklist
Noise
Case-Control Studies
History

Keywords

  • children
  • auditory processing disorders

Cite this

de Wit, E., van Dijk, P., Steenbergen, B., van der Schans, C., & Luinge, M. (2017). Are suspected auditory processing difficulties in children aged 8–12 years related to attention, working memory, nonverbal intelligence, and communication abilities?. 84-85. Abstract from 13th Congress of the European Federation of Audiology Societies 2017, Interlaken, Switzerland.

de Wit, Ellen; van Dijk, Pim; Steenbergen, B.; van der Schans, Cees; Luinge, Margreet / Are suspected auditory processing difficulties in children aged 8–12 years related to attention, working memory, nonverbal intelligence, and communication abilities?

2017. 84-85 Abstract from 13th Congress of the European Federation of Audiology Societies 2017, Interlaken, Switzerland.

Research output: Other research outputAbstract

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title = "Are suspected auditory processing difficulties in children aged 8–12 years related to attention, working memory, nonverbal intelligence, and communication abilities?",
keywords = "kinderen, gehoorstoornissen, children, auditory processing disorders",
author = "{de Wit}, Ellen and {van Dijk}, Pim and B. Steenbergen and {van der Schans}, Cees and Margreet Luinge",
year = "2017",
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Are suspected auditory processing difficulties in children aged 8–12 years related to attention, working memory, nonverbal intelligence, and communication abilities? / de Wit, Ellen; van Dijk, Pim; Steenbergen, B.; van der Schans, Cees; Luinge, Margreet.

2017. 84-85 Abstract from 13th Congress of the European Federation of Audiology Societies 2017, Interlaken, Switzerland.

Research output: Other research outputAbstract

TY - CONF

T1 - Are suspected auditory processing difficulties in children aged 8–12 years related to attention, working memory, nonverbal intelligence, and communication abilities?

AU - de Wit,Ellen

AU - van Dijk,Pim

AU - Steenbergen,B.

AU - van der Schans,Cees

AU - Luinge,Margreet

PY - 2017/6/8

Y1 - 2017/6/8

N2 - Background: Children with difficulties in listening and understanding speech despite normal peripheral hearing, can be diagnosed with the diagnosis Auditory Processing Disorder (A). However, there are doubts about the validity of this diagnosis. The aim of this study was to examine the relation between the listening difficulties of children between 8 and 12 years with suspected A and the attention, working memory, nonverbal intelligence and communication abilities of these children.Material and methods: In this case-control study we examined 10 children who reported listening difficulties in spite of normal peripheral hearing (3 referred by speech-language pathologist in the Northern Netherlands, 6 by an audiological center in the Southern Netherlands and one by parental concern) and 21 typically developing children (recruitment through word of mouth and by the website Taalexpert.nl), ages 8;0 to 12;0 years. The parents of all children completed three questionnaires about history, behavioral symptoms of ADHD, and communication skills (Children’s Communication Checklist). Teachers of the children completed the Children’s Auditory Processing Performance Scale (CHAPPS). Children were assessed for auditory processing abilities (speech-in-noise, filtered speech, binaural fusion, dichotic listening), nonverbal intelligence (Raven’s Coloured Progressive Matrices), and working memory (Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals). Auditory and visual attention was studied with four behavioral tests of the WAFF battery of the Vienna Test System (Schuhfried).Results: Preliminary analysis shows no differences between groups on the auditory processing tests and nonverbal intelligence quotient. Children in the experimental group have poorer communication performance (parent report), poorer listening skills (teacher report), and poorer working memory and attention skills (behavioral tests).Conclusions: The results of this study showed that there is a difference between children with listening complaints and typically developing children, but that the problems are not specific to the auditory modality. There seems to be no evidence for the validity of an auditory deficit.

AB - Background: Children with difficulties in listening and understanding speech despite normal peripheral hearing, can be diagnosed with the diagnosis Auditory Processing Disorder (A). However, there are doubts about the validity of this diagnosis. The aim of this study was to examine the relation between the listening difficulties of children between 8 and 12 years with suspected A and the attention, working memory, nonverbal intelligence and communication abilities of these children.Material and methods: In this case-control study we examined 10 children who reported listening difficulties in spite of normal peripheral hearing (3 referred by speech-language pathologist in the Northern Netherlands, 6 by an audiological center in the Southern Netherlands and one by parental concern) and 21 typically developing children (recruitment through word of mouth and by the website Taalexpert.nl), ages 8;0 to 12;0 years. The parents of all children completed three questionnaires about history, behavioral symptoms of ADHD, and communication skills (Children’s Communication Checklist). Teachers of the children completed the Children’s Auditory Processing Performance Scale (CHAPPS). Children were assessed for auditory processing abilities (speech-in-noise, filtered speech, binaural fusion, dichotic listening), nonverbal intelligence (Raven’s Coloured Progressive Matrices), and working memory (Clinical Evaluation of Language Fundamentals). Auditory and visual attention was studied with four behavioral tests of the WAFF battery of the Vienna Test System (Schuhfried).Results: Preliminary analysis shows no differences between groups on the auditory processing tests and nonverbal intelligence quotient. Children in the experimental group have poorer communication performance (parent report), poorer listening skills (teacher report), and poorer working memory and attention skills (behavioral tests).Conclusions: The results of this study showed that there is a difference between children with listening complaints and typically developing children, but that the problems are not specific to the auditory modality. There seems to be no evidence for the validity of an auditory deficit.

KW - kinderen

KW - gehoorstoornissen

KW - children

KW - auditory processing disorders

UR - http://www.journalofhearingscience.com/download/index/idArt/905276

M3 - Abstract

SP - 84

EP - 85

ER -

de Wit E, van Dijk P, Steenbergen B, van der Schans C, Luinge M. Are suspected auditory processing difficulties in children aged 8–12 years related to attention, working memory, nonverbal intelligence, and communication abilities?. 2017. Abstract from 13th Congress of the European Federation of Audiology Societies 2017, Interlaken, Switzerland.