Advanced glycation end-products are associated with physical activity and physical functioning in the older population

Hans Drenth, Sytse U Zuidema, Wim P Krijnen, Ivan Bautmans, Andries J Smit, Cees van der Schans, Hans Hobbelen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleAcademicpeer-review

Abstract

Background: Decline in physical activity and functioning is commonly observed in the older population and might be associated with biomarkers such as Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs). AGEs contribute to age-related decline in the function of cells and tissues in normal aging and have been found to be associated with motor function decline. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between the levels of AGEs, as assessed by skin autofluorescence, and the amount of physical activity and loss of physical functioning in older participants.

Methods: Cross-sectional data of 5,624 participants aged 65 years and older from the Lifelines cohort study was used. Linear regression analyses were utilized to study associations between skin autofluorescence/AGE-levels (AGE reader), the number of physically active days (SQUASH), and physical functioning (RAND-36), respectively. A logistic regression analysis was used to study associations between AGE-levels and the compliance with the Dutch physical activity guidelines (SQUASH).

Results: A statistical significant association between AGE levels and the number of physically active days (β = -0.21, 95% CI: -0.35 to -0.07, P = .004), physical functioning (β = -1.60, 95% CI: -2.64 to -0.54, P = .003), and compliance with the Dutch physical activity guidelines (OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.62 to 0.94, P = .010) was revealed.

Conclusions: This study indicates that high AGE levels may be a contributing factor as well as a biomarker for lower levels of physical activity and functioning in the older population.

LanguageEnglish
JournalThe journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 28 Apr 2018

Keywords

  • physical activities
  • elderly people

Cite this

@article{3cdd006e7af94a0b946ddb54a1379835,
title = "Advanced glycation end-products are associated with physical activity and physical functioning in the older population",
abstract = "Background: Decline in physical activity and functioning is commonly observed in the older population and might be associated with biomarkers such as Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs). AGEs contribute to age-related decline in the function of cells and tissues in normal aging and have been found to be associated with motor function decline. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between the levels of AGEs, as assessed by skin autofluorescence, and the amount of physical activity and loss of physical functioning in older participants.Methods: Cross-sectional data of 5,624 participants aged 65 years and older from the Lifelines cohort study was used. Linear regression analyses were utilized to study associations between skin autofluorescence/AGE-levels (AGE reader), the number of physically active days (SQUASH), and physical functioning (RAND-36), respectively. A logistic regression analysis was used to study associations between AGE-levels and the compliance with the Dutch physical activity guidelines (SQUASH).Results: A statistical significant association between AGE levels and the number of physically active days (β = -0.21, 95{\%} CI: -0.35 to -0.07, P = .004), physical functioning (β = -1.60, 95{\%} CI: -2.64 to -0.54, P = .003), and compliance with the Dutch physical activity guidelines (OR = 0.76, 95{\%} CI: 0.62 to 0.94, P = .010) was revealed.Conclusions: This study indicates that high AGE levels may be a contributing factor as well as a biomarker for lower levels of physical activity and functioning in the older population.",
keywords = "physical activities, elderly people, bewegen (activiteit), ouderen",
author = "Hans Drenth and Zuidema, {Sytse U} and Krijnen, {Wim P} and Ivan Bautmans and Smit, {Andries J} and Schans, {Cees van der} and Hans Hobbelen",
year = "2018",
month = "4",
day = "28",
doi = "10.1093/gerona/gly108",
language = "English",
journal = "The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences",
issn = "1079-5006",
publisher = "Oxford University Press",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Advanced glycation end-products are associated with physical activity and physical functioning in the older population

AU - Drenth, Hans

AU - Zuidema, Sytse U

AU - Krijnen, Wim P

AU - Bautmans, Ivan

AU - Smit, Andries J

AU - Schans, Cees van der

AU - Hobbelen, Hans

PY - 2018/4/28

Y1 - 2018/4/28

N2 - Background: Decline in physical activity and functioning is commonly observed in the older population and might be associated with biomarkers such as Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs). AGEs contribute to age-related decline in the function of cells and tissues in normal aging and have been found to be associated with motor function decline. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between the levels of AGEs, as assessed by skin autofluorescence, and the amount of physical activity and loss of physical functioning in older participants.Methods: Cross-sectional data of 5,624 participants aged 65 years and older from the Lifelines cohort study was used. Linear regression analyses were utilized to study associations between skin autofluorescence/AGE-levels (AGE reader), the number of physically active days (SQUASH), and physical functioning (RAND-36), respectively. A logistic regression analysis was used to study associations between AGE-levels and the compliance with the Dutch physical activity guidelines (SQUASH).Results: A statistical significant association between AGE levels and the number of physically active days (β = -0.21, 95% CI: -0.35 to -0.07, P = .004), physical functioning (β = -1.60, 95% CI: -2.64 to -0.54, P = .003), and compliance with the Dutch physical activity guidelines (OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.62 to 0.94, P = .010) was revealed.Conclusions: This study indicates that high AGE levels may be a contributing factor as well as a biomarker for lower levels of physical activity and functioning in the older population.

AB - Background: Decline in physical activity and functioning is commonly observed in the older population and might be associated with biomarkers such as Advanced Glycation End-products (AGEs). AGEs contribute to age-related decline in the function of cells and tissues in normal aging and have been found to be associated with motor function decline. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between the levels of AGEs, as assessed by skin autofluorescence, and the amount of physical activity and loss of physical functioning in older participants.Methods: Cross-sectional data of 5,624 participants aged 65 years and older from the Lifelines cohort study was used. Linear regression analyses were utilized to study associations between skin autofluorescence/AGE-levels (AGE reader), the number of physically active days (SQUASH), and physical functioning (RAND-36), respectively. A logistic regression analysis was used to study associations between AGE-levels and the compliance with the Dutch physical activity guidelines (SQUASH).Results: A statistical significant association between AGE levels and the number of physically active days (β = -0.21, 95% CI: -0.35 to -0.07, P = .004), physical functioning (β = -1.60, 95% CI: -2.64 to -0.54, P = .003), and compliance with the Dutch physical activity guidelines (OR = 0.76, 95% CI: 0.62 to 0.94, P = .010) was revealed.Conclusions: This study indicates that high AGE levels may be a contributing factor as well as a biomarker for lower levels of physical activity and functioning in the older population.

KW - physical activities

KW - elderly people

KW - bewegen (activiteit)

KW - ouderen

U2 - 10.1093/gerona/gly108

DO - 10.1093/gerona/gly108

M3 - Article

JO - The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences

T2 - The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences

JF - The journals of gerontology. Series A, Biological sciences and medical sciences

SN - 1079-5006

ER -